18th Annual Convocation, United Holy Church of America

18th Annual Convocation, United Holy Church of America, ca. 1930. Paul Henderson, HEN.09.09-006.

18th Annual Convocation, United Holy Church of America, ca. 1930. Paul Henderson, HEN.09.09-006.

The black church is considered to be the focal point of the community’s social, political, and cultural life. Typically associated with collective action by blacks, the church created a community of support, spiritual guidance, and other groups. Parishioners of black churches throughout history took the lead in organizing their congregations in civil rights and political actions as well as spiritual revival.

Image information:

18th Annual Convocation, United Holy Church of America
Baltimore, Maryland
Not dated (ca. 1930)
Paul Henderson, 1899-1988
4 in. x 5 in. acetate negative
Paul Henderson Photograph Collection, HEN.09.09-006.

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Pearl Bailey in her dressing room

Pearl Bailey in her dressing room, ca. 1942. Paul Henderson, HEN.00.A2-247.

Pearl Bailey in her dressing room, ca. 1942. Paul Henderson, HEN.00.A2-247.

This iconic photograph is seldom credited to Paul Henderson. Pearl Bailey (1918-1990), raised in Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, was an entertainer who started singing in nightclubs, later taking parts in films and a leading role in the first all-black Broadway production, Hello Dolly! (1968). She played Smith’s Hotel and Cafe as well as Club Astoria in Baltimore.

Image information:

Pearl Bailey in her dressing room
ca. 1942
Paul Henderson, 1899-1988
4 in. x 5 in. acetate negative
Paul Henderson Photograph Collection, HEN.00.A2-247
Maryland Historical Society

Governor Theodore McKeldin

Gov. McKeldin with Marse Callaway and Carl Murphy. Paul Henderson. MdHS, HEN.00.B1-069.

Governor Theodore McKeldin (1900–1974), Marse Callaway, and Carl Murphy (1889–1967) were immensely important in the struggle for civil rights. After his first of two terms as Mayor of Baltimore, Republican Gov. McKeldin took office in 1951 until 1959. Promoting racial justice early in his political career, he gained powerful allies in the black community. Callaway served as McKeldin’s political aide, bridging the issues of the black community to Gov. McKeldin. Murphy, editor-publisher of the Afro-American newspaper, helped shape the movement by choosing its leaders, providing funding, and reporting issues to his readers. Image: Governor Theodore McKeldin in his office with Marse Callaway and Carl Murphy in background, Annapolis, 1951, Maryland Historical Society, HEN.00.B1-069

PHOTOGRAPHS AND AUDIO CLIP: Silas Craft, educator and school administrator involved with the Civil Rights movement through the NAACP of Howard and Montgomery Counties, speaks about Governor Theodore McKeldin. (McKeldin-Jackson Oral History Project, Maryland  Historical Society, OH 8137.)

Transcript:

Oh yes, always impressed with him [inaudible] He attempted to follow various kinds of suggestions as far as I could see, he did a pretty good job at keeping his formal commitments. What else… he annunciated. 

As far as I know, I wasn’t on the political circles, political circuit. Still not. But my general observation he was pretty pronounced in his behavior. And he did break barriers in the appointing of blacks to certain administrative posts that never held before in the history of America. 

But the state as a whole, from McKeldin [inaudible] governors had a way of shying away from the basic concerns of the black movement and civil rights. Governor after governor did not let themselves become too involved in those areas. Other than to provide some good service. 

I would say McKeldin was the forerunner of new thought in this area of race relations from the time I came to this state, to the time that he ended his administration. 

Certainly think he did a good job of breaking all… making the trail for change. Of course we know we could go back to when it got rid of the whole Jim Crow law here in the state… came right up to the apartments of blacks to administrative boards in the state [inaudible]. 

Verda Freeman Welcome

Maryland State Senator Verda Freeman Welcome, HEN.00.B1-054

After graduating from Coppin Normal School (now Coppin State University) and Morgan State College (now Morgan State University), Maryland State Senator Verda Welcome taught in Baltimore City Public Schools for eleven years. In 1958 she was the first black woman elected to the Maryland House of Delegates, representing the Fourth District of Baltimore City. In 1962 she was elected to the Maryland Senate, becoming the first black female senator in the United States. From the Senate seat, Senator Welcome passed legislation that dealt with issues of discrimination.

Source: Maryland State Archives, Women’s Hall of Fame

Image information:
Verda Freeman Welcome
1950
Paul Samuel Henderson, 1899-1988
Digital reproduction from 4 in. x 5 in. acetate negative
Paul Henderson Photograph Collection, HEN.00.B1-054
Maryland Historical Society

More photographs of Senator Welcome by Paul Henderson:

Clean Block Campaign

Clean Block Campaign. Paul Henderson. MdHS, HEN.00.A2-187

The Junior Department of the AFRO-AMERICAN newspaper launched the Clean Block Campaign on July 13, 1935 in an effort to encourage children to “wash their front steps and turn the hose on sidewalks and streets” during the summer months. The campaign hoped to encourage the community to demand the lessening of smoke and noises, prompt garbage collection, and upkeep of public squares. Clean Block campaigns sprung up in many large cities such as Newark, New Jersey; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Amherst, Virginia.

Source: AFRO-AMERICAN, July 13, 1966

Image information:
[Clean Block Campaign winner (center)]
Paul Samuel Henderson, 1899-1988
July 1948
Digital reproduction from 4 in. x 5 in. acetate negative
Paul Henderson Photograph Collection, HEN.00.A2-187
Maryland Historical Society

Labor Committee members of the NAACP

Labor Committee members of the NAACP. Paul Henderson. MdHS, HEN.00.A1-095

Baltimore AFRO-AMERICAN newspaper, January 1, 1950; pg. 14:
Headline: Laying Plans for Use of Skilled Workers on Y Annex

Labor Committee members of the NAACP’s Baltimore Branch discuss the pledge of the YMCA contractors to employ skilled workers on the annex building and map plans to open up skilled jobs on other construction projects. Seated from left are Clarence M. Mitchell, Jr., national NAACP labor secretary; Cecil Scott, C. M. Puryear; D. R. Page; the Revs Thomas Davis, Harrison Bryant; standing, the Rev. Eugene T. Grove; Emerson Brown Jr.; J. Alvin Jones and Raymond A. C. Young. [Image: Labor Committee members of the NAACP, December 1949, Maryland Historical Society, HEN.00.A1-095.]

WARNING. Audio Clip Contains Graphic Information About A Lynching. May Be Disturbing To Some Listeners. Audio Clip: Clarence Mitchell on the lynching in Princess Anne, Maryland; Paul Henderson attempting to photograph someone in the area of the lynching; and subsequent intimidation and violent tactics toward blacks in the community. (McKeldin-Jackson Oral History Project, OH 8209)